Feeling good about immaturity

It feels good to be generous of my time with students, trying to help them academically, to nurture their self-confidence and to know them as people, a process that lets them see more of myself than they are used to seeing in other teachers.  But this generosity, which is essentially a matter of treating students as human… Read More

Reflections on “Authority” in PALT

The demystification and weakening of authority from above in all spheres of life, and the corresponding empowerment of individuals — the strengthening of individual and personal authority— is an important elem ent in the long-term overall process of “globalization” (defined here as humanity’s realization of its unity). Read More

“Intimate” discussions with George

The published and forthcoming posts on George Whitfield in this blog — and many of those on other aspects of life at Hampton Grammar School — document the removal of one of the strands of cloth used in my own educational mummification. It is a narrow band that I am particularly happy to now see waving in the wind, and I’ve attached it as a tail to the high-dancing kite that is my life. Read More

A New Year question: What does “Do your best mean?”

With these simple understandings at the heart of any family or any curriculum we can create the kind of world that we want. It really is simple. Read More

Graduate level laughter

Knowing how to and feeling free to respond to people as individuals first, students of a particular field second, seems to me to be the essence of a holistic approach to education. Read More

Reading and a feeling of guilt

George J.N. Whitfield, nicknamed “George” by all the boys at Hampton Grammar School, was a no-nonsense authoritarian educator — a real establishment character who inspired fear and respect.  I have a lot of memories of him, but I don’t remember him ever saying a word to me personally in the whole of the time I was… Read More