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Japanese Learner English: put on & wear

Japanese learners don’t seem to be able to get out of the habit of using “put on” when they  should be using “wear,” as in “Do you see that guy who is putting on a hat?” Correction doesn’t seem to help.

I don’t know why I never thought of this before, but it seems to work.  All you have to do is ask learners what they spend most of the time doing, “putting on” or “wearing” clothes.  Of course the answer is “wearing.”

Most of the time, in daily use,  we use “wear.” And most of the time, when learners confuse these verbs, they are using “put on” instead of “wear,” so remembering what they themselves spend the most time doing — wearing — is a useful technique for remembering.

Wh- words for expressing emotion

Looking carefully at language used by relatively advanced or even advanced learners of English, often through study of a learner corpus, can suggest ways of ordering instruction in early stages that can help to avoid later fossilization of inappropriate usage. This post offers an example that illustrates this point.

Children of War and Peace

There are many of us who, with fathers and grandfathers who fought in the war, share a sense of mission to ensure that peace prevails over the anger that leads to war. Many of us also feel that Japan, with its unique history of war, natural disaster and more recently nuclear contamination, has the potential to be a leading voice for peace in the world.

Natural Resources

I’ve been enjoying reading Donella Meadows’ book, “Thinking in Systems.”

donnella-meadows-az-quote

The incredible quote here, which  isn’t from the book, deserves special attention.  This is a prominent environmentalist talking, a scientist.   What she is saying is that our most important resource is already within us.

I’d like to add that we can choose to tap into it whenever we wish.  It is there for us at any time.

I’ll talk about the book in other posts.